Chronic Pain

- Patients with regular follow-up

Many patients today are treated outside of hospital with frequent outpatient follow-up. In many cases this is favorable for the patient, and cheaper for the state.

A central challenge with this form of treatment is information regarding how the patient has been between sessions.

By using Grasp it is possible to map and follow-up on symptoms. Grasp will give patient and doctor insight into the scope of symptoms. This makes quicker and better personalized follow-up and identification possible for appropriate action.

Background: Turid

‘Turid’ has chronic back pain. She has had back pains for many years, and reduced physical activity has led to obesity. In the last six months she has also been diagnosed with Diabetes. She has regular follow-ups with her doctor, and receives painkillers to take with meals. Turid has difficulties explaining what produces the pain and when the pain is worst.

Case

- Patient with chronic pain

Use: To understand the scope and to map the time of day when Turid is experiencing the worst pain her GP wants her to use Grasp for a period of time. She is instructed to squeeze the Grasp when she is in pain, squeezing hard during intense pain, and softer during lighter pains.

Analysis: Turid has used the Grasp for four days when she comes back to her GP. Grasp Insight shows that Turid has intense pains each morning. Days with the worst pains during the morning hours often worsen through the day. She suffers a new wave of pain in the late afternoon.

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Turid has pain in the morning hour and in the late afternoon.

Response: The GP suggests changing the times when Turid takes her painkillers. Turid should take a painkiller one hour before she wakes up. She should also take one painkiller in the late afternoon. This will halve the amounts of painkillers she is ingesting while treating the worst pain she experiences in a normal day.

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